Here's how fishing stifles the ocean's ability to capture carbon

Here's how fishing stifles the ocean's ability to capture carbon
When fish die naturally, their bodies and the carbon they contain sink to the depths of the ocean.Yet when fished, this carbon is released into the atmosphere as CO2.As the world has overlooked the ability of fish to act as a natural carbon sink, scientists now estimate carbon emissions from fishing are 25% higher than previously believed. A fish that dies naturally in the ocean sinks to the depths, taking with it all the carbon it contains. Yet,...
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This is now the world’s greatest threat – and it’s not coronavirus

This is now the world’s greatest threat – and it’s not coronavirus
Affluence is the biggest threat to our world, according to a new scientific report.True sustainability will only be achieved through drastic lifestyle changes, it argues.The World Economic Forum has called for a great reset of capitalism in the wake of the pandemic. A detailed analysis of environmental research has revealed the greatest threat to the world: affluence. That's one of the main conclusions of a team of scientists from Australia, Swit...
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Can we actually learn to live with coronavirus? Not until we have a vaccine

covid-19
As we move into the last quarter of 2020, the virus that has defined this troubled year is showing no signs of going away. In the absence of a vaccine or a broadly effective treatment, some are now saying that we must learn to live with COVID-19. But what does that actually look like? It's a complicated question that boils down to this: Should we allow SARS-CoV-2 to spread through most of the population while shielding all the elderly and those a...
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Restoring seagrasses can bring coastal bays back to life

sea grass
A century ago Virginia's coastal lagoons were a natural paradise. Fishing boats bobbed on the waves as geese flocked overhead. Beneath the surface, miles of seagrass gently swayed in the surf, making the seabed look like a vast underwater prairie. More than 70 species of seagrasses grow in shallow waters around the world, on every continent except Antarctica. In Virginia, beds of eelgrass (Zostera marina) provided habitat for bay scallops and foo...
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Biden’s climate change plans can quickly raise the bar, but can they be transformative?

Joe_Biden
The day Joe Biden becomes president, he can start taking actions that can help slow climate change. The question is whether he can match the magnitude of the challenge. If his administration focuses only on what is politically possible and fails to build a coordinated response that also addresses the social and economic ramifications of both climate change and the U.S. policy response, it is unlikely to succeed. I have spent much of my career wor...
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China's plan to launch the world’s largest carbon trading scheme by 2025

shanghai
China's national emissions trading scheme (ETS) is expected to eclipse that of the European Union to become the world's largest carbon trading scheme.The scheme is designed to include all major industrial sectors, from construction to power generation.While first mentioned in 2015 ahead of the Paris climate agreement, technical problems have plagued the scheme, delaying it for a further 5 years. China is targeting the launch of a nationwide emiss...
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How investing in girls' education could return billions in GDP

How investing in girls' education could return billions in GDP
For every dollar invested into girls' rights and education, developing nations could see a return of $2.80, according to a new report.Targets to improve girls education are included in the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, signed by world leaders in 2015.Around 130 million girls worldwide were out of school before COVID-19, according to UNESCO, and more than 11 million may not return to classes. Making sure all girls are finishing secondary edu...
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The world's poorest people are owed $5.7 trillion, says Oxfam

money-2
• Last year, OECD members only gave 0.3% of their GNI to aid – less than the 0.7% promised. • 0.7% would help the world's poorest countries meet the SDGs for a decade. • Stable aid flows are needed more than ever during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. On 24 October 1970, the world's richest countries made a promise that would better the lives of people around the world. They committed to give a small percentage of their income – just 0.7% – in i...
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These researchers have found a way to turn a common plastic into high-value molecules

These researchers have found a way to turn a common plastic into high-value molecules
More than 8.3 billion metric tonnes of plastic has been produced in the last six decades.However, recycling plastic can be difficult as the most common process involves melting and reworking the material.A new process developed by the University of California can turn polyethylene into useful smaller molecules. If you thought those flimsy disposable plastic grocery bags represented most of our plastic waste problem, think again. The volume of pla...
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The best way to restore our forests is to let nature take its course

The best way to restore our forests is to let nature take its course
Planting new forests is recognised as a powerful natural climate solution, but the best way to achieve this is still a matter for debate.New research suggests natural regrowth could be the most effective approach.Letting nature take its course promotes native species and biodiversity at a fraction of the cost of manual tree-planting. Susan Cook-Patton was planting a native red oak seedling in her backyard. As she finished and stepped back to admi...
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