Tuesday, 08 June 2021
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CO₂ Reaches Its Highest Level in More Than 4 Million Years.

The New Normal. Enjoy the Ride.
;~).
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-06-07/co-reaches-its-highest-level-in-more-than-4-million-years
6 days ago
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#861
The really interesting question is why this isn’t front page news everyday and the top priority of every legislative platform. The solution is, in a sense, simple, but, as they say, it is easier to imagine the end of the world than to do it. ;)
6 days ago
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#862
Seemingly simple; deceivingly complex. Thanks for your comment.

The most perplexing dilemma will be cultural. Global population will increase by 20% in the next 29 years. Most of this growth will occur in Africa and India, which will concurrently experience massive demographic transitions. I live in Africa, where most cars are 20 years old. That's not going to magically change. For these populations, fossil fuels will remain firmly entrenched. How does the developed world convince the developing world that living like them is a bad idea?
6 days ago
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#863
Gradually, then suddenly; Hemingway (1926, p. 136).

A tipping point.
Fast forward to an uncertain future. What can we expect? As Earth is a sytem of systems in motion, extreme temperature variations; storm volatility; inundated coastlines; disease prevalence; unprecedented migration. In a word, change. A new normal. Humans as a species will likely survive but in greatly reduced numbers and in drastically altered environments. Bezos and Musk might colonize Mars. But then what? Remember Jamestown? Perhaps Hobbes' (1651) cynical view of life was correct. Context matters!

Background readings:

A 4.5 Billion-Year History of CO₂

https://lnkd.in/d-jMGTY.

A planet in flux | Nature

https://lnkd.in/dvmEfA7
4 days ago
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#864
Change the title, its 4 million years not 4 billion years - huge difference in the geologic timescale and its inherent history ;-)
3 days ago
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#866
Change the title, its 4 million years not 4 billion years - huge difference in the geologic timescale and its inherent history ;-)


Thanks, I have edited the title accordingly.

Adam Thyer, Founder at GreenExecutive

3 days ago
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#867
Thanks for acknowledgement and correction of the error. Agree that the two time referents represent big differences. Apologies for missing it in the initial post.
3 days ago
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#868
What the developing world has is land in relative comparison to the developed world.
The incentivisation to use the land for not only food but biofeedstocks sustainably is one route to close the techno-economic gap.
This also drives the developing world to follow a different path
3 days ago
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#869
Perhaps. But people in the developing world, 80% of whom are subsistence farmers, don't think in terms of your Western rationalization. As my driver says in response to discussions of coronavirus infections or CO2, "God will provide. We are his people." Half the world's population think in a deterministic mindset while simultaneously expressing the aspiration to live as we in the West live. For this world going forward through a major demographic transition, I see little interest to embrace the scientific rationality of the developed world. For them, fossil fuels in cars is a predetermined way of life.
1 day ago
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#871

The most perplexing dilemma will be cultural. Global population will increase by 20% in the next 29 years. Most of this growth will occur in Africa and India, which will concurrently experience massive demographic transitions. I live in Africa, where most cars are 20 years old. That's not going to magically change. For these populations, fossil fuels will remain firmly entrenched. How does the developed world convince the developing world that living like them is a bad idea?


Many people claim that population growth in the developing world doesn't matter because the lion's share of consumption takes place in developed countries. However, I suspect many of those who say this have not spent much time in low-income countries. If they had, they'd know that most of these people desperately want the same extravagant lifestyles they've seen in western media. They'd also be horrified by the environmental decimation that has already happened despite relatively low per-capita consumption levels.

Adam Thyer, Founder at GreenExecutive

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