Restoring seagrasses can bring coastal bays back to life

sea grass
A century ago Virginia's coastal lagoons were a natural paradise. Fishing boats bobbed on the waves as geese flocked overhead. Beneath the surface, miles of seagrass gently swayed in the surf, making the seabed look like a vast underwater prairie. More than 70 species of seagrasses grow in shallow waters around the world, on every continent except Antarctica. In Virginia, beds of eelgrass (Zostera marina) provided habitat for bay scallops and foo...
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The best way to restore our forests is to let nature take its course

The best way to restore our forests is to let nature take its course
Planting new forests is recognised as a powerful natural climate solution, but the best way to achieve this is still a matter for debate.New research suggests natural regrowth could be the most effective approach.Letting nature take its course promotes native species and biodiversity at a fraction of the cost of manual tree-planting. Susan Cook-Patton was planting a native red oak seedling in her backyard. As she finished and stepped back to admi...
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Why the world needs a 'circular bioeconomy' - for jobs, biodiversity and prosperity

Why the world needs a 'circular bioeconomy' - for jobs, biodiversity and prosperity
Our current economic system has failed to value nature.We need a new economic model: a circular bioeconomy.As part of his Sustainable Markets Initiative, HRH The Prince of Wales establishes Circular Bioeconomy Alliance to accelerate transformation to climate- and nature-positive economy. There is no future for business as usual. Our current economic system, which arguably has succeeded in creating unprecedented economic output, wealth and human w...
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How to reverse global wildlife declines by 2050

elephant
Species are going extinct at an unprecedented rate. Wildlife populations have fallen by more than two-thirds over the last 50 years, according to a new report from the World Wildlife Fund. The sharpest declines have occurred throughout the world's rivers and lakes, where freshwater wildlife has plummeted by 84% since 1970 – about 4% per year. But why should we care? Because the health of nature is intimately linked to the health of humans. The em...
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David Attenborough leads call for world to invest $500 billion a year to protect nature

David Attenborough
Sir David Attenborough has led a call for global investment of $500 billion annually to support current biodiversity.Attenborough emphasised the risks of doing nothing - for all of us.The call was made as a UN summit began aimed at boosting action to protecting wildlife. British broadcaster David Attenborough on Wednesday led a campaign by conservation groups for the world to invest $500 billion a year to halt the destruction of nature, saying th...
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Here's how we can eradicate plastic pollution by 2040

Here's how we can eradicate plastic pollution by 2040
We can reduce the amount of plastic pollution entering our oceans by 80% using existing technology.Indonesia has published a new roadmap that aims to end plastic pollution completely by 2040.The lessons learned here will be applicable to other countries around the world. A new analysis published in the journal Science shows that the business-as-usual approach to tackling ocean plastic pollution isn't working. Even worse, should we continue down t...
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How rewilding Britain could absorb even more CO2 than tree planting

How rewilding Britain could absorb even more CO2 than tree planting
England's current woodland covers only 10% of the country and current regenerative plans are only planning to increase this by 2%, by 2050.If woodland cover was increased to 26%, 10% of the nation's carbon would be adsorbed naturally, whilst supporting dwindling wildlife.Rewilding - allowing woodland to regenerate naturally on a large scale - is the most effective way to increase woodland cover. Allowing trees to naturally establish over huge are...
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Wildlife populations have plummeted by two-thirds in 50 years

Wildlife populations have plummeted by two-thirds in 50 years
Natural areas that used to support biodiversity and have been converted for farming are the biggest reason for the population decline of thousands of species around the world.The WWF study has found that the average population size has dropped by 68% worldwide since 1970.These declines are stark warnings that human activity is becoming unsustainable on Earth. The average size of wildlife populations has plummeted by two-thirds worldwide since 197...
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Coral reefs: climate change and pesticides could conspire to crash fish populations

Coral reefs: climate change and pesticides could conspire to crash fish populations
Australia barely had time to recover from record breaking fires at the start of 2020 before the Great Barrier Reef experienced its third mass coral bleaching event in the past five years. Only five of these have occurred since records began in the 1980s. High water temperatures and marine heatwaves, caused by climate change, are making coral bleaching an almost regular occurrence in some parts of the world. Coral reefs are among the most vibrant ...
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Trump greenlights drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, but will oil companies show up?

Trump greenlights drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, but will oil companies show up?
The Trump administration has announced that it is opening up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to oil and gas development – the latest twist in a decades-long battle over the fate of this remote area. Its timing is truly terrible. Low oil prices, a pandemic-driven recession and looming elections add up to highly unfavorable conditions for launching expensive drilling operations. In the longer term, the climate crisis and an ongoing shift...
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