1. Henrik Schoenefeldt
  2. Built Environment
  3. Wednesday, 18 March 2020
The practice of post-occupancy evaluation, an important part of contemporary sustainable design, is generally perceived as a modern development. My research, however, has shown that it was a much more longstanding practice. An article on historic practices of environmental post-occupancy evaluation has been published in the journal Building Research & Information.

This article, entitled 'The House of Commons: a precedent for post-occupancy evaluation', examines the practices adopted to manage, empirically evaluate and improve the environment inside the House of Commons chamber over a period of 100 years. The article examines the post-occupancy history of the Charles Barry's original debating chamber, which was occupied from 1852 up until its destruction during air raids in 1941, and also explore how the scientific investigations undertaken inside the historic chamber had informed the design of the modern debating chamber after the war.

The full reference for this article is:

Henrik Schoenefeldt (2019) The House of Commons: a precedent for post-occupancy evaluation, Building Research & Information, 47:6, pp. 635-665

The article, which is open access thanks to funding from the University of Kent, can be downloaded via the following link:
References
  1. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09613218.2019.1547547
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Hi Henrik Schoenefeldt

An interesting article, many thanks for sharing it!

For the benefit of anyone not familiar with the term "post-occupancy evaluation", it is the process of evaluating buildings after they've been built and occupied for some time with the goal of improving the ways they are used to support productivity and wellbeing. — FYI, I'm just paraphrasing Wikipedia here, so feel free to correct me.

It seems very logical that the British House of Commons would be an early example of this practice. A place of government is clearly somewhere that you want a building to be creating the best possible outcomes for its occupants.

I know that some of our members are architects and building performance experts, so they might be interested in learning more about the origins of post-occupancy evaluation. I'm therefore shouting-out to you: Andrew Currie, Melinda Rowena Regodon Michael Drage, Marylis Ramos, and Dillon Webbe :)

Henrik Schoenefeldt, if you have any colleagues or graduate students who might be interested in GreenExecutive, it would be wonderful if you could invite them. The built environment plays an important role in environmental and social sustainability, so I'm keen to have experts from this area contributing to our community. I extend the same request to the people I've tagged above, or anyone else who might be reading this.
Adam Thyer, Founder at GreenExecutive
  1. more than a month ago
  2. Built Environment
  3. # 1
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
FYI, I have moved this post to Built Environment/Architecture & Design.
Adam Thyer, Founder at GreenExecutive
  1. more than a month ago
  2. Built Environment
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
I have a casual interest in architecture and history. Even as someone who's not expert in these topics, I found this to be a fascinating read. Thanks!
  1. more than a month ago
  2. Built Environment
  3. # 3
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