Saturday, 10 April 2021
  5 Replies
  183 Visits
Mura Technology claims to have created a technology that can recycle ALL kinds of plastics back into the chemical and oil products from which they were made for re-use in the production of new virgin grade plastics or other hydrocarbon based products. In other words, this technology could allow plastics to become circular.



https://www.circularonline.co.uk/news/ground-breaking-technology-to-recycle-all-forms-of-plastic-waste/
more than a month ago
·
#755
I saw the video and understand the concept. It's definitely not a claim. But to treat plastic to the level they are doing would have a huge CAPEX. I have technology that is modular in nature using Microwave Pyrolysis to break down plastic into carbon black and oil. CAPEX for this is very low, but small volumes can be treated and would be very difficult to handle the large amounts of plastic waste being generated.
more than a month ago
·
#756
As always the devil is in the detail.
There are a number of chemical recycling technologies and all have merits but often the differentiator is cost.
If the cost of producing less refined material from waste plastics is more expensive than refining oil or sugar then it’s a tricky one, even if the taxes etc fir recycled are onerous.
Also it’s a difficult genuine claim to say a plastic produced from say pyrolysis is recycled plastic, it may come recycled feedstock but it’s a grey area.
Finally we must be really careful we don’t drive poorly constructed difficult to recycle plastic materials to a default energy intensive recovery solution
more than a month ago
·
#768
This story in Forbes claims that the technology has the support of David Attenborough.

It also mentions a plastic tax:

In Europe, efforts are afoot to deal more systematically with the plastic problem: in January, the EU introduced a plastic tax that charges firms €800 ($946) for every ton of non-recycled plastic used. And from 2022, the U.K. government will start charging £200 ($274) per ton for plastic packaging that has less than 30% recycled content.


Steve Mahon, CEO of Mura Technology, said such rules could help to make recycling more cost-competitive.

"We believe we can reach a point where we can compete with virgin materials on cost alone,” he said. “This is really important if we are to make recycled content the preferred choice for the whole industry.”
more than a month ago
·
#772
I am watching this technology with keen interest. It would be wonderful if works as advertised and achieves widespread adoption. However, I agree with John that the devil is in the detail. Only time will tell if can live up to the claims.

I am enthusiastic about taxing non-recycled plastics. However, the UK tax is too low.
more than a month ago
·
#779
I heard about Mura's technology quite a while ago now. The claims are impressive.

I agree with the comments above that the devil can be in the detail. However, this story from last week is encouraging. Apparently, they have convinced Dow that the technology is the real deal:

Materials science leader Dow and Mura Technology, a company specializing in advanced plastic recycling based in Teeside, UK, have entered into a partnership to help keep plastic waste out of the environment. The collaboration will support the rapid scaling of Mura’s new HydroPRS — Hydrothermal Plastic Recycling Solution — that aims to prevent plastic and carbon from entering the natural environment while creating feedstock for a sustainable, circular plastics economy.


The world’s first plant using HydroPRS is in development in Teeside, with the first 20,000-tonne-per-year line expected to be operational in 2022. Once all four lines are complete, Mura will be able to recycle up to 80,000 tonnes of plastic waste per year, providing Dow with materials produced by the process. Dow will use these materials to develop new, virgin-grade plastic for applications such as food packaging and other packaging products to be re-circulated into global supply chains, creating a true circular plastics economy, said the companies.


Applying its proprietary technology, Mura hopes to have one million tonnes of recycling capacity in development worldwide by 2025. The partnership with Dow is a key driver of this goal.
  • Page :
  • 1
There are no replies made for this post yet.
Be one of the first to reply to this post!
© GreenExecutive. All rights reserved.